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#FoodhallTestKitchen: Thinking of switching to a #plantbased diet? Turns out, one of the best places to start is your morning cup of #coffee or #tea. So @padmakkb tried three homemade non-dairy #mylks that don’t break the bank (or the #blender): 1. #OatMilk: soak 2 Tbsp instant oats in 1 cup of room temperature water for 1 hour. Blend until smooth, and strain through a fine sieve • The pros: creamy consistency, pleasant ‘oaty’ flavour, economical • The cons: can sometimes develop a slimy texture • How we like to use it: heated and frothed for a #vegan #cappuccino or #latte 2. #AlmondMilk: soak 10 almonds in 1 cup of room temperature water for at least 3 hours. Blend and strain through a muslin cloth • The pros: neutral flavour and colour • The cons: Watery consistency, tends to ‘split’ when heated up, expensive • How we like to use it: stirred into a strong cup of black #tea, or in baking recipes that call for a splash of milk 3. #CoconutMilk: blend 3 Tbsp grated coconut with 1 cup of room temperature water, and strain through a fine sieve. • The pros: Similar in texture to milk, mild flavour, heat-stable • The cons: a bit laborious to grate the coconut • How we like to use it: the most versatile of the lot, this works well as a milk substitute in sweets like custard, pastry cream, ice creams; or savoury preparations like curries and stews Have you tried making any alternative milks at home? Let us know your favourites in the comments below!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: Thinking of switching to a #plantbased diet? Turns out, one of the best places to start is your morning cup of #coffee or #tea. So @padmakkb tried three homemade non-dairy #mylks that don’t break the bank (or the #blender): 1. #OatMilk: soak 2 Tbsp instant oats in 1 cup of room temperature water for 1 hour. Blend until smooth, and strain through a fine sieve • The pros: creamy consistency, pleasant ‘oaty’ flavour, economical • The cons: can sometimes develop a slimy texture • How we like to use it: heated and frothed for a #vegan #cappuccino or #latte 2. #AlmondMilk: soak 10 almonds in 1 cup of room temperature water for at least 3 hours. Blend and strain through a muslin cloth • The pros: neutral flavour and colour • The cons: Watery consistency, tends to ‘split’ when heated up, expensive • How we like to use it: stirred into a strong cup of black #tea, or in baking recipes that call for a splash of milk 3. #CoconutMilk: blend 3 Tbsp grated coconut with 1 cup of room temperature water, and strain through a fine sieve. • The pros: Similar in texture to milk, mild flavour, heat-stable • The cons: a bit laborious to grate the coconut • How we like to use it: the most versatile of the lot, this works well as a milk substitute in sweets like custard, pastry cream, ice creams; or savoury preparations like curries and stews Have you tried making any alternative milks at home? Let us know your favourites in the comments below!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: Thinking of switching to a #plantbased diet? Turns out, one of the best places to start is your morning cup of #coffee or #tea. So @padmakkb tried three homemade non-dairy #mylks that don’t break the bank (or the #blender): 1. #OatMilk: soak 2 Tbsp instant oats in 1 cup of room temperature water for 1 hour. Blend until smooth, and strain through a fine sieve • The pros: creamy consistency, pleasant ‘oaty’ flavour, economical • The cons: can sometimes develop a slimy texture • How we like to use it: heated and frothed for a #vegan #cappuccino or #latte 2. #AlmondMilk: soak 10 almonds in 1 cup of room temperature water for at least 3 hours. Blend and strain through a muslin cloth • The pros: neutral flavour and colour • The cons: Watery consistency, tends to ‘split’ when heated up, expensive • How we like to use it: stirred into a strong cup of black #tea, or in baking recipes that call for a splash of milk 3. #CoconutMilk: blend 3 Tbsp grated coconut with 1 cup of room temperature water, and strain through a fine sieve. • The pros: Similar in texture to milk, mild flavour, heat-stable • The cons: a bit laborious to grate the coconut • How we like to use it: the most versatile of the lot, this works well as a milk substitute in sweets like custard, pastry cream, ice creams; or savoury preparations like curries and stews Have you tried making any alternative milks at home? Let us know your favourites in the comments below!

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#FoodhallTestKitchen: What’s the best technique for the perfect #pesto? @padmakkb tried 3 popular methods to get to bottom of this mystery! Ingredients: • Basil leaves - 1 cup • Pine nuts or cashews - 2 tbsp • Garlic - 2 cloves • Olive oil - 4 tbsp • Parmigiano Reggiano - 2 tbsp, grated • Salt to taste 1. Mortar & Pestle: There’s a reason why the #classics just work! This method of pesto-ing yields a smooth paste with chunky bits of #basil, and retains a vibrant green hue 2. Blender: This yielded a much smoother and more even particle size. Careful, though, because blending on high speed can easily take you from peak pesto consistency into puree territory! 3. Chopping Board: If you’re looking for a really rustic sauce with a bite to it, then using a knife and chopping board yields just that! Mincing the fresh ingredients and stirring through the oil creates more of a dressing than a pesto, but would work well on #pasta, or even grills and #roasts What’s your trick to a punchy pesto? Let us know in the comments below!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: What’s the best technique for the perfect #pesto? @padmakkb tried 3 popular methods to get to bottom of this mystery! Ingredients: • Basil leaves - 1 cup • Pine nuts or cashews - 2 tbsp • Garlic - 2 cloves • Olive oil - 4 tbsp • Parmigiano Reggiano - 2 tbsp, grated • Salt to taste 1. Mortar & Pestle: There’s a reason why the #classics just work! This method of pesto-ing yields a smooth paste with chunky bits of #basil, and retains a vibrant green hue 2. Blender: This yielded a much smoother and more even particle size. Careful, though, because blending on high speed can easily take you from peak pesto consistency into puree territory! 3. Chopping Board: If you’re looking for a really rustic sauce with a bite to it, then using a knife and chopping board yields just that! Mincing the fresh ingredients and stirring through the oil creates more of a dressing than a pesto, but would work well on #pasta, or even grills and #roasts What’s your trick to a punchy pesto? Let us know in the comments below!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: What’s the best technique for the perfect #pesto? @padmakkb tried 3 popular methods to get to bottom of this mystery! Ingredients: • Basil leaves - 1 cup • Pine nuts or cashews - 2 tbsp • Garlic - 2 cloves • Olive oil - 4 tbsp • Parmigiano Reggiano - 2 tbsp, grated • Salt to taste 1. Mortar & Pestle: There’s a reason why the #classics just work! This method of pesto-ing yields a smooth paste with chunky bits of #basil, and retains a vibrant green hue 2. Blender: This yielded a much smoother and more even particle size. Careful, though, because blending on high speed can easily take you from peak pesto consistency into puree territory! 3. Chopping Board: If you’re looking for a really rustic sauce with a bite to it, then using a knife and chopping board yields just that! Mincing the fresh ingredients and stirring through the oil creates more of a dressing than a pesto, but would work well on #pasta, or even grills and #roasts What’s your trick to a punchy pesto? Let us know in the comments below!

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#FoodhallTestKitchen: What’s the best technique for the perfect #pesto? We tried 3 popular methods to get to bottom of this mystery! Ingredients: • Basil leaves - 1 cup • Pine nuts or cashews - 2 tbsp • Garlic - 2 cloves • Olive oil - 4 tbsp • Parmigiano Reggiano - 2 tbsp, grated • Salt to taste 1. Mortar & Pestle: There’s a reason why the #classics just work! This method of pesto-ing yields a smooth paste with chunky bits of #basil, and retains a vibrant green hue 2. Blender: This yielded a much smoother and more even particle size. Careful, though, because blending on high speed can easily take you from peak pesto consistency into purée territory! 3. Chopping Board: If you’re looking for a really rustic sauce with a bite to it, then using a knife and chopping board yields just that! Mincing the #fresh ingredients and stirring through the oil creates more of a dressing than a pesto, but would work well on #pasta, or even grills and #roasts What’s your trick to a punchy pesto? Let us know in the comments below!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: What’s the best technique for the perfect #pesto? We tried 3 popular methods to get to bottom of this mystery! Ingredients: • Basil leaves - 1 cup • Pine nuts or cashews - 2 tbsp • Garlic - 2 cloves • Olive oil - 4 tbsp • Parmigiano Reggiano - 2 tbsp, grated • Salt to taste 1. Mortar & Pestle: There’s a reason why the #classics just work! This method of pesto-ing yields a smooth paste with chunky bits of #basil, and retains a vibrant green hue 2. Blender: This yielded a much smoother and more even particle size. Careful, though, because blending on high speed can easily take you from peak pesto consistency into purée territory! 3. Chopping Board: If you’re looking for a really rustic sauce with a bite to it, then using a knife and chopping board yields just that! Mincing the #fresh ingredients and stirring through the oil creates more of a dressing than a pesto, but would work well on #pasta, or even grills and #roasts What’s your trick to a punchy pesto? Let us know in the comments below!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: What’s the best technique for the perfect #pesto? We tried 3 popular methods to get to bottom of this mystery! Ingredients: • Basil leaves - 1 cup • Pine nuts or cashews - 2 tbsp • Garlic - 2 cloves • Olive oil - 4 tbsp • Parmigiano Reggiano - 2 tbsp, grated • Salt to taste 1. Mortar & Pestle: There’s a reason why the #classics just work! This method of pesto-ing yields a smooth paste with chunky bits of #basil, and retains a vibrant green hue 2. Blender: This yielded a much smoother and more even particle size. Careful, though, because blending on high speed can easily take you from peak pesto consistency into purée territory! 3. Chopping Board: If you’re looking for a really rustic sauce with a bite to it, then using a knife and chopping board yields just that! Mincing the #fresh ingredients and stirring through the oil creates more of a dressing than a pesto, but would work well on #pasta, or even grills and #roasts What’s your trick to a punchy pesto? Let us know in the comments below!

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#FoodhallTestKitchen: Everyone has their own patented method of making the perfect cup of #chai, but which is the best? All water? Water first, then milk? All milk? We tested out the 3 most popular chai #brewing techniques so you don’t have to guess anymore! 1. Just Water: True #tea drinkers know this is the OG way to consume the beverage. With no milk or sugar to dilute the flavour, this brew packs the maximum flavour (when brewed right). Boil a cup of water and add tea leaves of your choice just before the water reaches a boil. Wait until you get the desired colour and remove from heat. 2. Water & Milk: For when you love your tea but prefer a milder brew, make your tea as mentioned above and add a little milk after you’ve poured the tea in your cup. By brewing the tea in water and not #milk, you’ll ensure you still get maximum flavour but it’s softened ever-so-slightly with the milk (sugar optional) 3. Just Milk: There’s a certain element of nostalgia when it comes to “doodh wali chai”. From Share Bazaar in Calcutta to every nook and corner in #Bombay, this kadak chai loaded with sugar is brewed purely in milk until it reduces to 2/3rd its volume. Simply add a spoon of tea leaves to a cup of milk and brew on a medium to high flame. Add in a teaspoon of sugar as well and watch the colour deepen. Want to experiment more in the kitchen? Check out our class calendar over at @foodhallcookerystudio and sign up for an upcoming session!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: Everyone has their own patented method of making the perfect cup of #chai, but which is the best? All water? Water first, then milk? All milk? We tested out the 3 most popular chai #brewing techniques so you don’t have to guess anymore! 1. Just Water: True #tea drinkers know this is the OG way to consume the beverage. With no milk or sugar to dilute the flavour, this brew packs the maximum flavour (when brewed right). Boil a cup of water and add tea leaves of your choice just before the water reaches a boil. Wait until you get the desired colour and remove from heat. 2. Water & Milk: For when you love your tea but prefer a milder brew, make your tea as mentioned above and add a little milk after you’ve poured the tea in your cup. By brewing the tea in water and not #milk, you’ll ensure you still get maximum flavour but it’s softened ever-so-slightly with the milk (sugar optional) 3. Just Milk: There’s a certain element of nostalgia when it comes to “doodh wali chai”. From Share Bazaar in Calcutta to every nook and corner in #Bombay, this kadak chai loaded with sugar is brewed purely in milk until it reduces to 2/3rd its volume. Simply add a spoon of tea leaves to a cup of milk and brew on a medium to high flame. Add in a teaspoon of sugar as well and watch the colour deepen. Want to experiment more in the kitchen? Check out our class calendar over at @foodhallcookerystudio and sign up for an upcoming session!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: Everyone has their own patented method of making the perfect cup of #chai, but which is the best? All water? Water first, then milk? All milk? We tested out the 3 most popular chai #brewing techniques so you don’t have to guess anymore! 1. Just Water: True #tea drinkers know this is the OG way to consume the beverage. With no milk or sugar to dilute the flavour, this brew packs the maximum flavour (when brewed right). Boil a cup of water and add tea leaves of your choice just before the water reaches a boil. Wait until you get the desired colour and remove from heat. 2. Water & Milk: For when you love your tea but prefer a milder brew, make your tea as mentioned above and add a little milk after you’ve poured the tea in your cup. By brewing the tea in water and not #milk, you’ll ensure you still get maximum flavour but it’s softened ever-so-slightly with the milk (sugar optional) 3. Just Milk: There’s a certain element of nostalgia when it comes to “doodh wali chai”. From Share Bazaar in Calcutta to every nook and corner in #Bombay, this kadak chai loaded with sugar is brewed purely in milk until it reduces to 2/3rd its volume. Simply add a spoon of tea leaves to a cup of milk and brew on a medium to high flame. Add in a teaspoon of sugar as well and watch the colour deepen. Want to experiment more in the kitchen? Check out our class calendar over at @foodhallcookerystudio and sign up for an upcoming session!

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#FoodhallTestKitchen: Everyone has their own patented method of making the perfect cup of #chai, but which is the best? All water? Water first, then milk? All milk? We tested out the 3 most popular chai brewing techniques so you don’t have to guess anymore! 1. Just Water: True tea drinkers know this is the OG way to consume the beverage. With no milk or sugar to dilute the flavour, this brew packs the maximum flavour (when brewed right). Boil a cup of water and add tea leaves of your choice just before the water reaches a boil. Wait until you get the desired colour and remove from heat. 2. Water & Milk: For when you love your tea but prefer a milder brew, make your tea as mentioned above and add a little milk after you’ve poured the tea in your cup. By brewing the tea in water and not milk, you’ll ensure you still get maximum flavour but it’s softened ever-so-slightly with the milk (sugar optional) 3. Just Milk: There’s a certain element of nostalgia when it comes to “doodh wali chai”. From Share Bazaar in Calcutta to every nook and corner in Bombay, this kadak chai loaded with sugar is brewed purely in milk until it reduces to 2/3rd its volume. Simply add a spoon of tea leaves to a cup of milk and brew on a medium to high flame. Add in a teaspoon of sugar as well and watch the colour deepen. Want to experiment more in the kitchen? Check out our class calendar over at @foodhallcookerystudio and sign up for an upcoming session!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: Everyone has their own patented method of making the perfect cup of #chai, but which is the best? All water? Water first, then milk? All milk? We tested out the 3 most popular chai brewing techniques so you don’t have to guess anymore! 1. Just Water: True tea drinkers know this is the OG way to consume the beverage. With no milk or sugar to dilute the flavour, this brew packs the maximum flavour (when brewed right). Boil a cup of water and add tea leaves of your choice just before the water reaches a boil. Wait until you get the desired colour and remove from heat. 2. Water & Milk: For when you love your tea but prefer a milder brew, make your tea as mentioned above and add a little milk after you’ve poured the tea in your cup. By brewing the tea in water and not milk, you’ll ensure you still get maximum flavour but it’s softened ever-so-slightly with the milk (sugar optional) 3. Just Milk: There’s a certain element of nostalgia when it comes to “doodh wali chai”. From Share Bazaar in Calcutta to every nook and corner in Bombay, this kadak chai loaded with sugar is brewed purely in milk until it reduces to 2/3rd its volume. Simply add a spoon of tea leaves to a cup of milk and brew on a medium to high flame. Add in a teaspoon of sugar as well and watch the colour deepen. Want to experiment more in the kitchen? Check out our class calendar over at @foodhallcookerystudio and sign up for an upcoming session!

#FoodhallTestKitchen: Everyone has their own patented method of making the perfect cup of #chai, but which is the best? All water? Water first, then milk? All milk? We tested out the 3 most popular chai brewing techniques so you don’t have to guess anymore! 1. Just Water: True tea drinkers know this is the OG way to consume the beverage. With no milk or sugar to dilute the flavour, this brew packs the maximum flavour (when brewed right). Boil a cup of water and add tea leaves of your choice just before the water reaches a boil. Wait until you get the desired colour and remove from heat. 2. Water & Milk: For when you love your tea but prefer a milder brew, make your tea as mentioned above and add a little milk after you’ve poured the tea in your cup. By brewing the tea in water and not milk, you’ll ensure you still get maximum flavour but it’s softened ever-so-slightly with the milk (sugar optional) 3. Just Milk: There’s a certain element of nostalgia when it comes to “doodh wali chai”. From Share Bazaar in Calcutta to every nook and corner in Bombay, this kadak chai loaded with sugar is brewed purely in milk until it reduces to 2/3rd its volume. Simply add a spoon of tea leaves to a cup of milk and brew on a medium to high flame. Add in a teaspoon of sugar as well and watch the colour deepen. Want to experiment more in the kitchen? Check out our class calendar over at @foodhallcookerystudio and sign up for an upcoming session!

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