that traditional bread doesn’t need baker’s yeast to rise? The leavening occurs by the use of a ‘starter’ - a sticky batter of flour and water, that is using environmental yeast. The starter takes on a sourness due to the wild yeast it contains, thus imparting a subtle tang to the baked Hence the name sourdough! If you’re keen to try your hand at making your own starter, it takes 5 days and is very simple. Here’s how to make and “feed” the starter to keep it alive: • Day 1 (Initiate the starter) - Using in wide-mouth glass jar, mix ¾ cup + 2 tbsp flour with ½ cup filtered water. Use a fork to incorporate all the dry flour. It should be like a sticky thick paste, like peanut butter. Scrape down the sides & place the lid lightly or a wet towel to keep the moisture in, and let it sit at room temperature on the kitchen counter for 24 hours • Day 2 (Feed the starter) - You may see very few bubbles. This means the wild yeast have started making themselves at home in your starter. If you don’t see any bubbles, keep it for a little longer - upto 48 hours. Today, add another ¾ cup + 2 tbsp of flour and ½ cup of filtered water to your starter and stir vigorously, until combined. Let the mixture sit loosely covered in the same place/conditions or above the refrigerator for another 24 hours • Day 3 (Feed it again) - By now your starter should have doubled in volume, looking like a It will smell a bit pungent. Feed the starter (¾ cup + 2 tbsp flour and ½ cup filtered water) and stir until combined. Scrape down the sides again and cover it loosely with a lid or a wet cloth. Secure it for another 24 hours • Day 4 (Feed, feed, feed) - Check your starter, it should look very It should be smelling and tasting vinegary - YES, you can taste it too! Repeat the feeding process and place the jar in the same location • Day 5 (Starter is ready to use) - It’s THE day. The starter should have up and should look very bubbly and frothy! If you stir, it should feel loose and webbed • How to keep the starter alive - Discard half (or better yet, use!) and ‘feed’ it with new flour & water

DidYouKnow, sourdough, fermented, bread., honeycomb., bubbly., bulked

Foodhall,  DidYouKnow, sourdough, fermented, bread., honeycomb., bubbly., bulked

#DidYouKnow that traditional #sourdough bread doesn’t need baker’s yeast to rise? The leavening occurs by the use of a ‘starter’ - a sticky batter of flour and water, that is #fermented using environmental yeast. The starter takes on a sourness due to the wild yeast it contains, thus imparting a subtle tang to the baked #bread. Hence the name sourdough!

If you’re keen to try your hand at making your own starter, it takes 5 days and is very simple. Here’s how to make and “feed” the starter to keep it alive:

• Day 1 (Initiate the starter) - Using in wide-mouth glass jar, mix ¾ cup + 2 tbsp flour with ½ cup filtered water. Use a fork to incorporate all the dry flour. It should be like a sticky thick paste, like peanut butter. Scrape down the sides & place the lid lightly or a wet towel to keep the moisture in, and let it sit at room temperature on the kitchen counter for 24 hours

• Day 2 (Feed the starter) - You may see very few bubbles. This means the wild yeast have started making themselves at home in your starter. If you don’t see any bubbles, keep it for a little longer - upto 48 hours. Today, add another ¾ cup + 2 tbsp of flour and ½ cup of filtered water to your starter and stir vigorously, until combined. Let the mixture sit loosely covered in the same place/conditions or above the refrigerator for another 24 hours

• Day 3 (Feed it again) - By now your starter should have doubled in volume, looking like a #honeycomb. It will smell a bit pungent. Feed the starter (¾ cup + 2 tbsp flour and ½ cup filtered water) and stir until combined. Scrape down the sides again and cover it loosely with a lid or a wet cloth. Secure it for another 24 hours

• Day 4 (Feed, feed, feed) - Check your starter, it should look very #bubbly. It should be smelling and tasting vinegary - YES, you can taste it too! Repeat the feeding process and place the jar in the same location

• Day 5 (Starter is ready to use) - It’s THE day. The starter should have #bulked up and should look very bubbly and frothy! If you stir, it should feel loose and webbed

• How to keep the starter alive - Discard half (or better yet, use!) and ‘feed’ it with new flour & water

#DidYouKnow that traditional #sourdough bread doesn’t need baker’s yeast to rise? The leavening occurs by the use of a ‘starter’ - a sticky batter of flour and water, that is #fermented using environmental yeast. The starter takes on a sourness due to the wild yeast it contains, thus imparting a subtle tang to the baked #bread. Hence the name sourdough! If you’re keen to try your hand at making your own starter, it takes 5 days and is very simple. Here’s how to make and “feed” the starter to keep it alive: • Day 1 (Initiate the starter) - Using in wide-mouth glass jar, mix ¾ cup + 2 tbsp flour with ½ cup filtered water. Use a fork to incorporate all the dry flour. It should be like a sticky thick paste, like peanut butter. Scrape down the sides & place the lid lightly or a wet towel to keep the moisture in, and let it sit at room temperature on the kitchen counter for 24 hours • Day 2 (Feed the starter) - You may see very few bubbles. This means the wild yeast have started making themselves at home in your starter. If you don’t see any bubbles, keep it for a little longer - upto 48 hours. Today, add another ¾ cup + 2 tbsp of flour and ½ cup of filtered water to your starter and stir vigorously, until combined. Let the mixture sit loosely covered in the same place/conditions or above the refrigerator for another 24 hours • Day 3 (Feed it again) - By now your starter should have doubled in volume, looking like a #honeycomb. It will smell a bit pungent. Feed the starter (¾ cup + 2 tbsp flour and ½ cup filtered water) and stir until combined. Scrape down the sides again and cover it loosely with a lid or a wet cloth. Secure it for another 24 hours • Day 4 (Feed, feed, feed) - Check your starter, it should look very #bubbly. It should be smelling and tasting vinegary - YES, you can taste it too! Repeat the feeding process and place the jar in the same location • Day 5 (Starter is ready to use) - It’s THE day. The starter should have #bulked up and should look very bubbly and frothy! If you stir, it should feel loose and webbed • How to keep the starter alive - Discard half (or better yet, use!) and ‘feed’ it with new flour & water

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